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Author Topic:   Incompetent Government = No Planning = No Water, ...
Vatandoost
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posted June 26, 2001 09:53     Click Here to See the Profile for Vatandoost   Click Here to Email Vatandoost     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Subterranean canals to be exploited to meet water shortage in Tehran

Tehran, June 25, IRNA -- Managing Director of Water and Sewerage Company of Tehran Province Sattar Mahmoudi said that only 23 subterranean canals out of the existing number of 286 in Tehran could be exploited to deal with water shortage, adding that operations would be launched this year despite heavy costs. In a first step toward water rationing in the megalopolis Tehran, the water supply to several districts in Tehran was cut last week for 12 hours.

Water rationing has started in several provinces and cities in the country that are in their third consecutive year of suffering from widespread drought.

The level of water reservoirs supplying water to the capital has sharply dropped by 200 million cubic meters in the current Iranian calendar year, started March 21.

Officials have said they would begin fining citizens who consume more than 20 cubic meters (20,000 liters) of water per month, as of June 22.

Mahmoudi said that in order to eliminate water shortage in Tehran, a list has been prepared of all the existing deep wells and subterranean canals with proper quality in the megalopolis.

Stressing that rehabilitation of each canal and transferring its refined water into the water network of the city costs Rls 1,000 million, the official said however, such mechanism could only meet 50 percent of the water requirements whereas the remaining 50 percent should be met through cooperation of subscribers.

He put the total capacity of water reservoirs at Karaj, Laar and Latian dams at 99 million cubic meters, adding that water consumption in Tehran is now some 2.6 million cubic meters of which about 1.6 is maintained by dams and the remaining by subterranean reserves.

Mahmoudi said that given the above-mentioned figure, water reservoirs of Karaj, Laar and Latian dams can meet water demands of Tehran for less than two months whereas the dams should have reserves for at least five to six months.

Meanwhile, a London-based company announced recently that Kuwait and Iran have agreed to build a two-billion-dollar pipeline that will transfer fresh water from northern Iran to Kuwait.

Multinational group Gulf Utilities said the Kuwaiti cabinet had finally approved the deal after more than a year of talks on the pipeline, which would ship water from the Karkheh dam in northern Iran to Kuwait some 650 kilometers (400 miles) to the south.

The deal could serve as a model for other water pipeline projects in a region where water plays an often critical geo-strategic role, a spokesman for Gulf Utilities said.

Gulf Utilities, a British-led company which has Iranian and Kuwaiti stockholders, said that the Kuwaiti cabinet had formally approved the proposals, and were setting up bodies to work on the project and would soon despatch officials to Tehran to finalize the deal.

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Ardalan
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posted June 27, 2001 09:16     Click Here to See the Profile for Ardalan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Drought-hit Iran plays down concerns over water export

Tehran, June 26, IRNA -- The energy ministry has played down concerns among the Iranians over water export to Kuwait while the nation is experiencing a severe drought for the third year running. "The people must not be concerned over the issue of pumping water. Even though such a project is agreed to be implemented it would need at least five years to come on stream," the Persian daily Aftab-e Yazd quoted deputy energy minister Rasoul Zargar as saying.

"The issue of water export to the Persian Gulf littoral states is only a plan that may be taken into account," the Persian daily Aftab-e Yazd quoted deputy energy minister Rasoul Zargar as saying.

Iran is facing an absolute water crisis as a result of a severe drought hitting the country for the third year running, and also overconsumption of water.

Despite this, Kuwait and Iran have agreed to build a two-billion-dollar pipeline that will transport fresh water from western Iran to Kuwait.

A government team is to hold talks with a British-led consortium on building a pipeline to transport fresh water from Iran to Kuwait.

"If agreed, Iran will pump water from the points where it is wasted and flown into the Persian Gulf and Oman Sea," Zargar told Aftab-e Yazd.

He noted that water export can earn Iran an income which could help her sharply cut the time needed for certain projects to come on stream.

Asked by the daily to comment on the presence of the British-led consortium in Iran for talks on the project, Zargar said, "The consortium is comprised of the British and Kuwait private sectors and we have thus far had no talks with them."

"If we agree to export water to Kuwait, the British consortium would receive license for building a pipeline for this purpose," he said.

Gulf Utilities said earlier the Kuwaiti cabinet had finally approved the deal after more than a year of talks on the pipeline, which would ship water from Karkheh dam in western Iran.

Iran has been rationing water in several cities and provinces, including the second largest city Mashhad in the northeast.

The energy ministry has warned that the water might be rationed in the capital within less than three weeks if the water overuse keeps rising.

The water and sewage organization has cut off 4,000 consumers who were overusing water, generally for swimming pools and other nonessential use.

Officials have started to fine citizens who consume more than 20 cubic meters (20,000 liters) of water per month since Saturday.

Iran, a major food importer, is bracing for a third successive year of drought, suffering its worst drought in three decades in 2000.

Last year's drought destroyed an estimated 2.8 million tons of wheat crop and 280,000 tons of barley, and destroyed 800,000 head of livestock.

While this year's drought is affecting fewer regions, experts say its impact may be greater in communities which have not recovered from the losses of the past two years.

Last week, the drought had forced residents of 100 villages in central Iran to leave their homeland in search of water.

"Water resources in 100 villages have run dry and the cattle perished," a local official told IRNA, adding "We are arranging camps for the evacuees."

"Agriculture and animal husbandry has been the only source of income for these villagers. Now they have nothing to live on," he said.

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